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Chemical Engineering

Whether you want to create new materials for biomedical applications or find solutions to clean up the environment, Arizona State University will give you the tools and experience to be successful.

Chemical engineering is a creative and dynamic discipline that involves the transformation of energy and matter into useful resources for society. You will use biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics as you work to convert raw materials and chemicals into more useful forms.

Whether you want to create new materials for biomedical applications or find solutions to clean up the environment, Arizona State University will give you the tools and experience to be successful.

Chemical engineers are often called “universal engineers.” They develop and produce a diverse range of products for aerospace, automotive, biomedical, electronic and military applications.

As a chemical engineer, you can create:

  • Plastics.
  • Petroleum products.
  • Pharmaceuticals.
  • Computer chips.
  • Specialty chemicals.
  • Bioproducts.

You might also work to help improve the environment by developing methods to reduce pollution or devising ways to recover usable materials from waste.

At ASU, you will have the opportunity to individualize your experience through research and discovery, cross-discipline exploration, internships and student organizations.

You’ll be prepared to solve real-world, multidisciplinary problems facing society.

The chemical engineering program at Arizona State University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. Student enrollment and graduation data are available at engineering.asu.edu/factbook/data.

Learn more about our Chemical Engineering degree programs

 

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Accelerated 4+1 program badgeChemical Engineering can be pursued as an accelerated 4+1 degree. Accelerated 4+1 programs combine advanced undergraduate course work with graduate course work, enabling students to earn both a bachelor’s and master’s degree within five years. Interested? Learn more about accelerated 4+1 degrees.

Admission Requirements

All students are required to meet general university admission requirements.

Freshman
Transfer
International
Readmission
Fulton Schools of Engineering

Application Deadlines

Fall

Priority – February 15
Final – July 1

Spring

Priority – October 15
Final – December 1

Financing Your Education

Scholarships
Find and apply for relevant scholarships.

Be sure to check out Fulton Schools’ scholarships available to both new and continuing students at engineering.asu.edu/scholarships.

Financial Aid
ASU has many financial aid options. Almost everyone, regardless of income, can qualify for some form of financial aid. In fact, more than 70 percent of all ASU students receive some form of financial assistance every year.

Chemical Engineering Degree

Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering

School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy

Location Tempe campus Tempe, Arizona

 

Graduate DegreesAccelerated 4+1 program badge

Finish two degrees faster by combining advanced undergraduate and graduate coursework during your senior year as part of the accelerated 4+1 bachelor’s plus master’s program.

M.S. in Chemical Engineering Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering

As a high school senior in Phoenix, Ariz., Jared applied to one school and one school only.

Now, four years later, Jared is not only a seasoned Sun Devil, but an entrepreneur with two start-up ventures, a chemical engineer with hands-on lab research experience, and after graduating with his bachelor’s degree, he is now pursuing a Ph.D.

Jared found it only takes one school to open up dozens of opportunities.

Jared was initially attracted to ASU for several reasons including the newly renovated living facilities of Barrett, The Honors College, and ASU’s focus on sustainability and alternative energy sources.

But it wasn’t until his first campus visit and orientation that engineering really took hold of Jared. During his orientation an older student encouraged Jared to meet with a faculty researcher in his lab, a real-world opportunity to get to know what engineering is all about. Through Jared’s meeting with this professor and other discussions at orientation it became evident that his childhood love for math, science, fixing broken objects and putting new things together were all signs of the type of scholar he was destined to be.

Taking advantage of life-changing opportunities

Jared encourages new students to take a serious look at an engineering degree and within the engineering program “to take advantage of the life-changing opportunities provided by EPICS and FURI.”

The Engineering Projects in Community Service program, known as EPICS, is a national award-winning social entrepreneurship program. Through EPICS, teams of motivated students design, build and deploy systems to solve engineering-based problems in their local community or even across the globe.

As a freshman, Jared joined an EPICS team developing ideas to reduce the amount of waste accumulated in the local Rio Salado Habitat. With experience and connections formed through his freshman year EPICS team, Jared now has his own start-up company called Sustainable Storm Solutions—focused on controlling unsustainable trash flow compiled during desert rain storms.

But Jared hasn’t limited his engineering service to just the local community. As a junior, Jared got involved in a second EPICS project that evolved into a for-profit venture called SafeSIPP. SafeSIPP has designed a portable water purification system that aims to reduce suffering and fatalities due to water-related illness in the developing world.

“The impact of various EPICS teams can reach from Tempe to South Africa, and it has,” says Jared. “EPICS is a must for engineering students interested in social projects, sharing ideas and making a difference.”

In addition to EPICS, Jared has found time to participate in lab research as an undergraduate student—a Fulton Engineering priority. Through FURI, the Fulton Undergraduate Research Initiative, Jared has spent time with professional researchers and doctoral students researching ionic liquids as a chemical engineer.

In Jared’s opinion, “One of the best things about undergraduate research is becoming friends with ASU faculty. These faculty members not only teach and guide you through your undergraduate studies, but are helpful resources for future internships and employment opportunities.”

Outside of the lab and community service, Jared enjoys networking and listening to guest speakers through the American Institute of Chemical Engineers club, as well as late-nights spent playing intramural football and softball on the Tempe campus.

Making the most of the college experience

In addition to being an undergraduate researcher, an entrepreneur, an intern and an intramural athlete, Jared will have a master’s degree by the spring of 2014, through the 4+1 program, an accelerated curriculum offered for various engineering degrees. This program allows for the completion of a bachelor’s and master’s degree in just five years through concurrent undergraduate and graduate coursework.

What do EPICS, FURI, and 4+1 have in common? They all allow motivated students, like Jared, to make the most out of their college experience.

Come to ASU to get connected with engineering opportunities inside and outside of the classroom.

Jared encourages new students to take a serious look at an engineering degree and within the engineering program “to take advantage of the life-changing opportunities provided by EPICS and FURI.”
  Jared